0113 293 0282 or 0113 204 4990 office@parklandsleeds.org.uk

Pupil Premium Strategy

Pupil Premium is a payment made to schools by the Government. It makes up part of the school’s funding, is received into our budget and is made available for use throughout the whole school. Schools are free to decide how to allocate this funding to best support the raising of attainment for the most vulnerable pupils.

Pupil Premium 2017/2018

Parklands has officially the highest number of children eligible for Pupil Premium money in Leeds at 72%.

Current Allocation:

In 2017/18 Parklands Primary School will receive £266,850 in Pupil Premium.

 

Main Barriers to Educational Achievement:

  • 38.5% of children are eligible for Free School Meals (FSM), compared to 18% for Leeds primary Schools and 14% for state-funded primary schools nationally. 65% attract Pupil Premium funding; one of the highest percentages of seen in Leeds.
  • 28% of children from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) backgrounds, compared to 35% for Leeds primary Schools and 32% for state-funded primary schools nationally.
  • 12% of children have English as an additional language (EAL), compared to 21% for Leeds primary Schools and 21% for state-funded primary schools nationally.
  • 29% of children have special educational needs (SEN), compared to 14% for Leeds primary Schools and 13% for state-funded primary schools nationally in 2016.
  • 83% of children live in an area classed as being amongst the 10% most deprived in England.
  • Low aspirations of the parents.
  • Low attainment on entry.
  • Attendance and punctuality.

 

Allocation Spend to Address Barriers:

  • An additional teacher in; in KS1  and four in Key Stage 2 to reduce class sizes and accelerate learning.
  • Additional teaching to ensure learning during PPA time is maximised in Key Stage 2 and Year 2 providing specialist Grammar teaching.
  • Additional Speech and Language provision including Teaching Assistant support.
  • Support for Breakfast Club to ensure a good start to the day and fresh fruit and milk for the whole school.
  • Subsidising enhancement activities such as residentials and educational visits.
  • Providing PE kits and water bottles for all children

Pupil Premium 2017 / 18

 

Summary of expenditure:

Expenditure Area Full Year Notes
Speech and Language £23,300
TA Support S&L £14,942
Small Class sizes: 5 class teachers £187,705 5 at MPS 4
After School Clubs £4,096 10 TA hrs per week
Educational visits including 3 residentials £20,000
Breakfast Club staffing £8,872 £228 per week (25 hrs B1)
Milk costs £7,068
KS2 Fruit £3,200
Volunteer Readers £1,200 Beanstalk
Total Expenditure £270,383  
Pupil Premium Allocation 17/18 @ Apr 17 £266,850  
Balance/Overspend -£3,533 Overspend

 

Measuring of Impact of the Pupil Premium:

 

KS2

 

Average Scaled Scores: Disadvantaged Reading GPS Maths
Parklands County Primary School Disadvantaged 103.2 105.7 108.0
Parklands County Primary School Other 108.6 112.0 113.4
Leeds Disadvantaged 99.7 102.2 100.2
Leeds Other 105.0 106.8 105.1
National Disadvantaged (FFTAspire) 101.4 103.6 101.7
Early National Other 105.4 107.0 105.3

ASP 2017

% achieving the expected standard: Disadvantaged Reading GPS Maths Writing TA RWM Pupils (RWM)
Parklands County Primary School Disadvantaged 61.3% 65 % 65 % 71.0% 61.3% 31
Parklands County Primary School Other 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 7
Leeds Disadvantaged 52.3% 60.6% 56.1% 55.9% 38.9%
Leeds Other 74.5% 81.1% 78.7% 77.2% 64.3%
National Disadvantaged (FFTAspire) 60% 66% 63% 65% 67%
National Other 77% 82% 80% 81% 67%

ASP 2017

 

 

*81% of the year group are eligible for Pupil Premium (PP) funding, either due to historical FSM eligibility or Looked After status – and therefore identified as ‘Disadvantaged’.

*The attainment of the 7 ‘Other’ children is very high, meaning that there are sizeable in-school gaps

* This should not distract attention from the fact that the attainment of the Disadvantaged children is much higher than that of Disadvantaged children nationally

* That their performance is consistently in line with that of ‘Other’ children nationally.

 

EYFS

* 16 children (31% of the cohort) were identified as eligible for Free School Meals.

* 6 (38%) achieved GLD; this proportion is lower than the 48% achieved by FSM children across Leeds and the 54% achieved by FSM children nationally in 2017.

* It should also be noted that the proportion of non-FSM children who achieved GLD in this cohort (61%) was lower than achieved by ‘similar’ children in Leeds (69%) and nationally in 2016 (72%). The in-school gap between FSM and non-FSM is slightly larger than average, at 23%pts; compared to a Leeds gap of 22%pts and a national gap in 2016 of 18%pts.

*An additional 7 children were identified as eligible for pupil premium (PP) funding, meaning there was a total of 23 children in this group. 10 (44%) achieved GLD; this is lower than the GLD figure for ‘Other’ children in the year group (61%) but similar to PP children in Leeds (49%). National figures for PP children are not currently available.

 

KS1

% achieving the expected standard: Disadvantaged Reading Writing Maths RWM Pupils
Parklands County Primary School Disadvantaged 62.1% 48.3% 62.1% 48.3% 29
Parklands County Primary School Other 64.7% 58.8% 64.7% 58.8% 17
Leeds Disadvantaged 53.6% 41.4% 52.8% 37.0%
Leeds Other 74.2% 65.5% 73.8% 60.9%
National Disadvantaged (FFTAspire) 63% 55 % 63% 50%
National Other 79% 72 % 79 % 64 %

ASP 2017

 

* The group of children eligible for Pupil Premium funding is 29% of the year group.

* These children are identified as ‘Disadvantaged’, either due to historical FSM eligibility or Looked After status.

* The results for this group see smaller than average gaps between Disadvantaged and ‘Other’ children.

 

Next Pupil Premium Strategy Review: Termly in Teaching and Learning Committee Oct 2018; March 2018; July 2018

 

How has the use of Pupil Premium benefitted pupils who are not eligible for funding:

* In a school where PP is so high (Y6 31 children Pupil Premium, 7 non PP), it is difficult to exclude the few. Therefore ALL the children benefit from small class sizes, Speech Therapy and interventions.

Pupil Premium 2016/17

Parklands has officially the highest number of children eligible for Pupil Premium money in Leeds at 72%.

Current Allocation:

In 2016/17 Parklands Primary School will receive £260040 in Pupil Premium.

 

Main Barriers to Educational Achievement:

  • 46% of children are eligible for Free School Meals (FSM), compared to 17% for Leeds primary Schools and 15% for state-funded primary schools nationally. 72% attract Pupil Premium funding; the joint highest of any primary school in Leeds.
  • 25% of children from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) backgrounds, compared to 33% for Leeds primary Schools and 31% for state-funded primary schools nationally.
  • 11% of children have English as an additional language (EAL), compared to 20% for Leeds primary Schools and 20% for state-funded primary schools nationally.
  • 32% of children have special educational needs (SEN), compared to 14% for Leeds primary Schools and 13% for state-funded primary schools nationally.
  • 83% of children live in an area classed as being amongst the 10% most deprived in England.
  • Low aspirations of the parents.
  • Low attainment on entry.
  • Attendance and punctuality.

 

Allocation Spend to Address Barriers:

  • An additional teacher in; in KS1 (Y2) and four in Key Stage 2 to reduce class sizes and accelerate learning.
  • Additional teaching to ensure learning during PPA time is maximised in Key Stage 2 and Year 2 providing specialist Grammar teaching.
  • Additional Speech and Language provision including Teaching Assistant support.
  • Support for Breakfast Club to ensure a good start to the day and fresh fruit and milk for the whole school.
  • Subsidising enhancement activities such as residentials and educational visits.
  • Providing PE kits and water bottles for all children

Pupil Premium 2016 / 17

 

Summary of expenditure:

Expenditure Area Full Year Notes
Speech and Language £40,000
TA Support S&L £11,630
Intervention £14,640 Carter Education
£25,793 SH
Small Class sizes: 4 class teachers £29,378 KS1 GR
£29,378 KS2 BN
£34,393 KS2 LT
£34,393 KS2 TC
After School Clubs £4,096 10 TA hrs per week
Educational visits including 3 residentials £20,000
Breakfast Club staffing £13,338 £351 per week (25 hrs B3 + 12.5 hrs B1)
Milk costs £7,068
KS2 Fruit £3,200
Volunteer Readers £360 Beanstalk
Total Expenditure £267,667  
Pupil Premium Allocation 16/17 @ Apr 16 £260,040  
Balance/Overspend -£7,627 Overspend

 

Measuring of Impact of the Pupil Premium (from Stokes Report V3 Sept 2016; updated Nov 2016 after Raise on Line released):

 

KS2

 

Average Scaled Scores: Disadvantaged Reading GPS Maths
Parklands County Primary School Disadvantaged 106.9 105.5 108.2
Parklands County Primary School Other 110.0 108.0 111.8
Leeds Disadvantaged 98.3 100.4 99.5
Leeds Other 103.3 104.9 103.8
Early National Disadvantaged 99.9 101.7 100.7
Early National Other 103.8 105.0 104.1

Data Source: School & National – RAISEONLINE 2016, unvalidated data. Leeds – Perspective Lite

 

% achieving the expected standard: Disadvantaged Reading GPS Maths Writing TA RWM Pupils (RWM)
Parklands County Primary School Disadvantaged 76% 79% 76% 59% 55% 29
Parklands County Primary School Other 100% 100% 100% 75% 75% 4
Leeds Disadvantaged 45% 54% 50% 54% 31%
Leeds Other 69% 77% 74% 74% 56%
Early National Disadvantaged 53% 61% 57% 64% 39%
Early National Other 71% 78% 75% 79% 60%

Data Source: School & National – RAISEONLINE 2016, unvalidated data. Leeds – Perspective Lite

 

*88% of the year group are eligible for Pupil Premium (PP) funding, either due to historical FSM eligibility or Looked After status – and therefore identified as ‘Disadvantaged’.

*The attainment of the 3 ‘Other’ children is very high, meaning that there are sizeable in-school gaps

* This should not distract attention from the fact that the attainment of the Disadvantaged children is much higher than that of Disadvantaged children nationally

* That their performance is consistently in line with that of ‘Other’ children nationally.

 

EYFS

* 12 children (36% of the cohort) were identified as eligible for Free School Meals.

* 7 (58%) achieved GLD; this proportion is higher than the 46% achieved by FSM children across Leeds and the 51% achieved by FSM children nationally in 2015.

* It should also be noted that the proportion of non-FSM children who achieved GLD in this cohort (62%) was lower than achieved by ‘similar’ children in Leeds (66%) and nationally in 2015 (69%). Consequently, the in-school gap between FSM and non-FSM is much smaller than average, at just under 4%pts; compared to a Leeds gap of 20%pts and a national gap in 2015 of 18%pts.

*An additional 4 children were identified as eligible for pupil premium (PP) funding, meaning there was a total of 16 children in this group. 10 (62.5%) achieved GLD; this is higher than the GLD figure for ‘Other’ children in the year group (59%) and much higher than for PP children in Leeds (46%). National figures for PP children are not currently available.

 

KS1

% achieving the expected standard: Disadvantaged Reading Maths Writing Pupils
Parklands County Primary School Disadvantaged 33% 26% 26% 27
Parklands County Primary School Other 56% 61% 56% 18
Leeds Disadvantaged 51% 49% 39%
Leeds Other 72% 71% 61%
Early National Disadvantaged 62% 60% 53%
Early National Other 78% 77% 70%

Data Source: School & National – RAISEONLINE 2016, unvalidated data. Leeds – Perspective Lite

 

* The group of children eligible for Pupil Premium funding is 60% of the year group.

* These children are identified as ‘Disadvantaged’, either due to historical FSM eligibility or Looked After status.

* The results for this group see large in-school gaps (ranging from 23%pts to 35%pts) between Disadvantaged and ‘Other’ children.

* There are also large gaps between the school’s Disadvantaged children and Disadvantaged children nationally (ranging from 27%pts to 34%pts).

* 2016 / 17 has seen a 3rd class formed in Y2 to create small class sizes. In Y3 to narrow the gap a 3rd teacher is employed (0.4).

 

Next Pupil Premium Strategy Review: Termly in Teaching and Learning Committee Oct 31st; March 2017; July 2017

 

How has the use of Pupil Premium benefitted pupils who are not eligible for funding:

* In a school where PP is so high (Y6 30 children Pupil Premium, 3 non PP), it is difficult to exclude the few. Therefore ALL the children benefit from small class sizes, Speech Therapy and interventions.

Pupil Premium 2015/16

Parklands has officially the highest number of Pupil Premium money in Leeds at 81.1%.

In 2015 / 16 Parklands Primary School received £325 380 in Pupil Premium.

How did we spend the money?

  • An additional teacher in Foundation Stage; in KS1 and three in Key Stage 2 to reduce class sizes and accelerate learning.
  • Additional teaching to ensure learning during PPA time is maximised in Key Stage 2 and Year 2 providing specialist Grammar teaching.
  • Additional Speech and Language provision including Teaching Assistant support.
  • A Behaviour Support Worker and an additional Learning Mentor to meet the needs of the vulnerable children.
  • Support for Breakfast Club to ensure a good start to the day and fresh fruit and milk for the whole school.
  • Subsidising enhancement activities such as residentials and educational visits.

Pupil Premium 2015 / 16

Summary of expenditure:

Speech and Language support £57 000 1.5 Therapists plus Teacher Assistant support
Additional teachers to reduce class sizes in FS; KS1 and KS2 £144 000 5 Full time teachers
Intervention work £55 500 2 Teachers
New Maths Scheme (incl Training) £10 000 After Ofsted recommendations
Educational Visits £20 000 Y4 Y5 Y6 residential
Breakfast Club (staffing and provisions to supplement Magic Breakfast support)

Fruit and Milk

£14 000

 

£11 600

37 hours a week @ B3
Beanstalk Volunteer Readers £1080
ICT resources (DB Primary) £2700
After school clubs £1500
Other Miscellaneous £8 000 * Water bottles

* PE kits

* Resources

* Northern Ballet

* Classopoly

* Team Point rewards

* Attendance Rewards

Total                                  £325 380

How did these actions impact on raising attainment?

OFSTED and DfE challenge schools to compare the attainment of their disadvantaged children against that of ‘other’ (non-disadvantaged) children, in order to raise aspirations and to promote the ‘Closing the gap’ agenda

  • Attainment at the end of Key Stage 2 :

% of the disadvantaged children 75% attained Level 4 in Reading, Writing and mathematics. This is 5% higher than the 70% National Figure and higher than the 67% of other Parklands figures.

 

  • KS2 Reading

78% @ L4 this is 5% behind the 83% Nat figure but 11% higher than Parklands other.

  • KS2 Writing

81% @ L4 this is 2% higher than the 79% Nat figure and 14% higher than Parklands other.

  • KS2 Grammar

72% @ L4 this is 1% higher than the 71% Nat figure and 14% higher than Parklands other.

  • KS2 Maths

75% @ L4 this is 5% behind the 80% Nat figure but 8% higher than Parklands other.

 

Expected Progress in Key Stage 2.

  • The proportion of disadvantaged children making expected progress in reading has risen from 82% in 2014 to 89% in 2015 and is just below the national figure for ‘Other’ children of 92%.
  • The proportion of disadvantaged children making better than expected progress in reading has risen from 25% in 2014 to 34% in 2015 and is above the national figure for ‘Other’ children of 33%.
  • The proportion of disadvantaged children making expected progress in writing has risen from 89% in 2014 to 91% in 2015 but is below the national figure for ‘Other’ children of 95%.
  • The proportion of disadvantaged children making better than expected progress in writing has risen from 32% in 2014 to 46% in 2015 and is well above the national figure for ‘Other’ children of 37%.
  • The proportion of disadvantaged children making expected progress in maths has risen from 71% in 2014 to 86% in 2015 but is below the national figure for ‘Other’ children of 91%.
  • The proportion of disadvantaged children making better than expected progress in maths has risen from 21% in 2014 to 29% in 2015 but is below the national figure of 37%.

 

 

Attainment at the end of Key Stage 1:

  • KS1 Reading

78% @ L2c this is 13% behind the 84% Nat figure and 5% lower than Parklands other

61% @ L2b this is 11% behind 72% Nat figure and 4% lower than Parklands other

 

  • KS1 Writing

71% @ L2c this is 8% behind 84% Nat figure and equal to Parklands other

57% @ L2b this is 2% behind 59% Nat figure and 8% lower than Parklands other

 

  • KS1 Maths

71% @ L2c this is 16% behind 87% Nat figure and 5% lower than Parklands other

54% @ L2b this is 17% behind 72% Nat figure and 5% lower than Parklands other.

 

 

Closing the Gap Summary.

  • At KS1, attainment is low for both disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged children and the gaps to ‘other’ children nationally are consistently large.
  • The proportions of disadvantaged children making expected and better than expected progress at KS2 are generally in line with and sometimes above those of ‘Other’ children nationally.
  • The KS2 VA scores of disadvantaged children are broadly in line with national in reading and writing and above average in Writing.
  • The in-school attainment gaps between disadvantaged and ‘other’ children are much smaller than the gap to national ‘other’ children. The APS gap between the school’s disadvantaged and national ‘other’ children is around 3pts overall. The attainment gap at L4+ is relatively small, but is much larger at L5+.
  • The VA scatter plot shows that the vast majority of disadvantaged children made progress that was broadly in line with expectation, with only 2 children making progress that was 2 points or more below expectation.

 

graph

In 2014/15 the Pupil Premium allocation was £304,700

  • This money has been invested in reducing class sizes in KS2 – creating 2 new positions.
  • 2 additional teachers were employed in KS2 to deliver intervention strategies for PP pupils.
  • A class based teacher was moved to deliver interventions in Y3 and Y4.
  • The DHT was made available to raise performance of Year 2 children for 3 afternoons per week.
  • Breakfast club will continue to be heavily subsidised by PP money to ensure the children are in school and safe to learn.
  • School residentials and enrichment activities such as links with Northern Ballet will be subsidised significantly from PP money.
  • The school is accountable for the distribution of the Pupil Premium funding and is committed to ensuring that it is used to positively impact on the outcomes of children’s learning. In addition the substantial investments in staffing and training will see scores in Key Stage 2 rise dramatically in line with KS1 when comparing to National Data.

 

Pupil Premium 2014/15

Summary of expenditure:

 

Speech and Language support (including full time teaching assistant) £58,720 2 Therapists

1 Teaching Assistant

Additional teachers to reduce class sizes (1 in KS1, 3 in KS2) £81,300 4 Full time teachers : 1 full year, 3 for two terms
Intervention work £59,130

 

3 Teachers (part time)
Behaviour Support Worker £9,900 2 terms

 

Educational Visits (including Y5 and Y6 residentials) £18,500
Breakfast Club (staffing and provisions to supplement Magic Breakfast support) £20,910 5 Teaching Assistants
Beanstalk Volunteer Readers £1,080

 

Additional equipment and resources £24,000

 

Extra classroom resources, games, books, Lend Me Your Learning, additional maths and literacy resources, House colour PE kits
ICT resources (including DB Primary) £5,700
Lunchtime Clubs / After School Clubs £2,470 TA 5 hours per week
Other Miscellaneous Expendiutre

 

£22,990 Northern Ballet

Classopoly

Team Point rewards

Attendance Rewards

 

Total                             £304,700

 

Pupil Premium 2014/15

Summary of expenditure:

 

Speech and Language support (including full time teaching assistant) £58,720 2 Therapists1 Teaching Assistant
Additional teachers to reduce class sizes (1 in KS1, 3 in KS2) £81,300 4 Full time teachers : 1 full year, 3 for two terms
Intervention work £59,130 3 Teachers (part time)
Behaviour Support Worker £9,900 2 terms
Educational Visits (including Y5 and Y6 residentials) £18,500
Breakfast Club (staffing and provisions to supplement Magic Breakfast support) £20,910 5 Teaching Assistants
Beanstalk Volunteer Readers £1,080
Additional equipment and resources £24,000 Extra classroom resources, games, books, Lend Me Your Learning, additional maths and literacy resources, House colour PE kits
ICT resources (including DB Primary) £5,700
Lunchtime Clubs / After School Clubs £2,470 TA 5 hours per week
Other Miscellaneous Expendiutre £22,990 Northern BalletClassopolyTeam Point rewards

Attendance Rewards

 

Total                                       £304,700